Trackmaster Miler 

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.

Trackmaster Miler

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.

$27,950.00

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Trackmaster Miler 

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.
Trackmaster Miler 

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.
Trackmaster Miler 

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.
Trackmaster Miler 

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.
Trackmaster Miler 

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.
Trackmaster Miler 

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.
Trackmaster Miler 

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.
Trackmaster Miler 

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.
Trackmaster Miler 

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.
Trackmaster Miler 

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.
Trackmaster Miler 

When Class C (flat-track) racing expanded and many riders began utilizing BSA and Triumph powerplants, a new market emerged for frames geared for this format. Initially they were called Sonic Weld, and eventually Sonic Weld and Champion would become the "go-to" manufacturers for dirt-track racing. Later, Sonic Weld changed its name to Trackmaster. In the 1970's, some of the biggest champions, such as Dick Mann and Gene Romero, were mounted on Trackmaster frames for their dirt-tracking endeavors. The frames were easy to adapt. Each came with engine plates for each particular engine application. It was easy enough to change from one manufacturer’s engine to another, and a variety of foot-peg brackets, seats and tanks were offered. Fork selection was left up to the rider .The Trackmaster legend lives on today with this modern street tracker. The nickel-plated, chrome-moly frames are still utilized. As always, they have the oil in frame design to make the unit more compact and utilitarian. An aluminum flat-track-style tank and seat grace the shiny frame, and 19-inch alloy wheels are fitted fore and aft. Dual TOKICO brakes are fitted on the front to the Barnes hubs, and another disc brake is fitted in the rear. The side panels hide a battery that is essential for starting the 88 CI Harley-Davidson EVO motor, and an electric starter, or “knee saver,” is also fitted. The later engines benefit from an electronic ignition. Of course like any dirt tracker, this unit is fitted with a custom-built straight-pipe exhaust system. This factory prototype is sold on a factory MSO.